Question Details

Answered: - Boston and New York City have both recently adopted Vision Zero


Boston and New York City have both recently adopted Vision Zero Plans. Provide an overview ofeach plan and its approach, and then compare and contrast the two plans. Make recommendations toimprove each plan. Minimum Length of document: New York overview ? 1 page, Boston overview ? 1page, compare and contrast ? 2 pages, recommendations ? 1 page for Boston, 1 page for New York.


CITY OF BOSTON TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

 


 

VISION ZERO BOSTON

 

ACTION PLAN

 

MAYOR MARTIN J. WALSH

 

DECEMBER 2015

 


 

CITY OF BOSTON TEAM

 

MAYOR MARTIN J. WALSH

 

Chris Osgood, Chief of Streets

 

Gina Fiandaca, Commissioner, Boston Transportation Department

 

Michael Dennehy, Commissioner (Interim), Boston Public Works Department

 

William B. Evans, Commissioner, Boston Police Department

 

James Hooley, Chief, Boston Emergency Medical Services

 

Huy Nguyen, Executive Director, Boston Public Health Commission

 

Jascha Franklin-Hodge, Chief Information Officer

 

Kristen McCosh, Commissioner, Boston Commission for Persons with Disabilities

 


 

Martin J. Walsh, Mayor

 

Commission on Affairs of the Elderly

 


 

[ 2 ] Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

5. Letter from the Mayor

 

6. Core Principles of Vision Zero

 

8. The Evolution of Vision Zero Boston

 

10. Vision Zero Boston: Why Now?

 

12. Focusing on the Issues

 

15. Detailed Action Plans

 

16. Action Plan to Reduce Speeds and

 

Build Safer Streets

 

18. Action Plan to Reduce Distracted

 

and Impaired Driving

 

20. Action Plan to Engage Bostonians in

 

Vision Zero

 

22. Action Plan to Hold Ourselves

 

Accountable

 

23. What You Can Do

 

24. Conclusion

 


 

Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan [ 3 ]

 


 

SPEED KILLS ALL TYPES

 

OF ROAD USERS: DRIVERS,

 

PEDESTRIANS, AND CYCLISTS.

 

A 5% CUT IN AVERAGE SPEED

 

CAN REDUCE THE NUMBER OF

 

FATAL CRASHES BY AS MUCH

 

AS 30%.

 

(WHO, 2007)

 


 

[ 4 ] Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan

 


 

I AM PROUD TO

 

BE THE MAYOR OF

 

AMERICA?S WALKING

 

CITY.

 

Dear Bostonians,

 

I am proud to be the Mayor of America?s Walking City.

 

I know that with that title comes the responsibility to

 

ensure that the hundreds of thousands of Bostonians

 

and visitors who use our streets every day have a

 

safe and enjoyable experience. Unfortunately, an average of two pedestrians

 

are hit by cars every day ? people like you and me who are simply trying to get

 

across the street. Almost as many people riding bikes are treated by our EMS

 

and every year thousands of drivers are injured, put in danger, or delayed by

 

collisions with other vehicles.

 

While only a handful of these crashes are fatal, every tragedy leaves a trail of

 

grieving family and friends, and the despair of unfulfilled potential. As Mayor, I

 

see the real people behind these statistics; I share the grief, pain, and sense of

 

loss that every crash report represents.

 

I grew up in Dorchester. We could walk to the store, to church, to a friend?s

 

house, or to a park. We could ride our bikes to school or to Boston Harbor. We

 

could get on a subway train or a bus and go to work almost anywhere in Greater

 

Boston. That freedom of movement is what made it a strong community ? tightly

 

knit and human scaled, but also fully connected to the wider world of jobs,

 

amenities, and culture.

 

Children growing up today deserve that same level of freedom and mobility. Our

 

seniors should be able to safely get around the communities they helped build

 

and have access to the world around them. Driving, walking, or riding a bike on

 

Boston?s streets should not be a test of courage.

 

We know how to build safer streets. We know how to protect our most

 

vulnerable road users, who are suffering disproportionately because of speeding

 

traffic and distracted drivers.

 

With this Action Plan, I am saying it?s time to act. It?s time to commit to

 

eliminating fatal and serious traffic crashes from our daily experience.

 


 

IT?S TIME FOR VISION ZERO.

 

Sincerely,

 

Martin J. Walsh

 

?

 


 

Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan [ 5 ]

 


 

VISION ZERO BOSTON?

 

CORE PRINCIPLES OF VISION ZERO

 

The Vision Zero concept was created in Sweden in 1997 and is widely credited

 

with a significant reduction in fatal and serious crashes on Sweden?s roads

 

since that time.

 

Cities across the United States are adopting bold Vision Zero initiatives that

 

share common principles:

 

1. Traffic deaths are preventable and unacceptable.

 

2. Human life takes priority over mobility and other objectives of the road

 

system. The street system should be safe for all users, for all modes of

 

transportation, in all communities, and for people of all ages and abilities.

 

3. Human error is inevitable and unpredictable; the transportation system

 

should be designed to anticipate error so the consequence is not

 

severe injury or death. Advancements in vehicle design and technology

 

are necessary to avoid the safety impacts of human errors and poor

 

behaviors.

 

4. People are inherently vulnerable and speed is a fundamental predictor of

 

crash survival. The transportation system should be designed for speeds

 

that protect human life.

 

5. Safe human behaviors, education, and enforcement are essential

 

contributors to a safe system.

 

6. Policies at all levels of government need to align with making safety the

 

highest priority for roadways.

 


 

30

 

MPH

 


 

20

 

MPH

 


 

18% likelihood

 

of fatality

 

or severe

 

injury

 


 

50% likelihood

 

of fatality

 

or severe

 

injury

 


 

40

 

MPH

 


 

77% likelihood

 

of fatality

 

or severe

 

injury

 


 

Source: Impact Speed and a Pedestrian?s Risk of

 

Severe Injury or Death, Brian Tefft, AAA Foundation

 

for Traffic Safety, 2011

 

[ 6 ] Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan

 


 

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR BOSTON?

 

Vision Zero Boston is our commitment to focus the city?s resources on proven

 

strategies to eliminate fatal and serious traffic crashes in the city by 2030. We

 

are inspired by the belief that even one fatality is too many.

 

While Boston has a relatively good record on traffic safety compared to many

 

other cities, Mayor Walsh is not content to accept 20+ fatalities and 200+

 

serious injuries on city streets every year. Death and serious injury are not part

 

of the cost of doing business in a busy city.

 

Vision Zero Boston looks behind the statistics at the human and economic cost

 

of traffic crashes; the barriers created by busy, high-speed roads in the heart

 

of our city; and the impact of speeding on neighborhood streets that can limit

 

access, mobility, and opportunity in communities that need it the most.

 

Vision Zero Boston makes traffic safety personal. Bostonians are going to meet

 

the victims of serious traffic crashes and the family and friends of people killed

 

on our streets. These are not just statistics, and traffic safety isn?t someone

 

else?s problem.

 

Vision Zero Boston prioritizes safety and takes a people-first approach to

 

transportation and community building. Most trips in the City of Boston are made

 

by people on foot, bike, or transit. Everyone, including drivers, benefits from a

 

transportation system that?s made safer for the most vulnerable road users.

 


 

Vision Zero Boston promises action in four critical

 

areas:

 


 

REDUCING SPEEDS

 

AND BUILDING

 

SAFER STREETS

 


 

TACKLING

 

DISTRACTED AND

 

IMPAIRED DRIVING

 


 

ENGAGING

 

BOSTONIANS WITH

 

VISION ZERO

 


 

HOLDING

 

OURSELVES

 

ACCOUNTABLE FOR

 

RESULTS

 


 

Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan [ 7 ]

 


 

THE EVOLUTION OF

 

VISION ZERO BOSTON

 

Boston is a city of many ?firsts? in transportation. Pierre Lallement, a Boston

 

resident from 1865-91, received a patent in 1866 for the invention of pedals

 

and crank arms that revolutionized the velocipede and enabled the modern-day

 

bicycle to emerge. In 1897, the Tremont Street Subway became the nation?s

 

first subway and in 1904, the City built the nation?s first underwater mass transit

 

tunnel.

 

The City was also a pioneer in recognizing the importance of open space

 

and livability. Visionaries such as Frederick Law Olmsted and Charles Eliot

 

designed the Emerald Necklace and the Metropolitan Park System, including

 

the parkways, in the 1880s and 1890s, and ensured critical access to natural

 

environments throughout the city.

 

In 1973, Governor Francis W. Sargent stopped a plan to build the Southwest

 

Expressway through the heart of the city and set the stage for using highway

 

funds to build the Orange Line and the Southwest Corridor Park. In the 2000s, a

 

pedestrian-friendly network of streets were built along greenways in downtown

 

and East Boston as part of the Central Artery project.

 

In more recent times, the City has embraced the benefits of a more walkable,

 

bikeable, and transit-friendly community. This was made possible by of a series

 

of notable active transportation policies, plans, and programs, including the

 

adoption of a Complete Streets approach to street design, the construction

 

of numerous public spaces that are safer for pedestrians and bicyclists, the

 

creation of the Boston Bikes program in 2007, and the launch of the Hubway

 

bike share system in 2011.

 

In 2014, the City launched a bold new initiative to envision the future of

 

transportation. Go Boston 2030 features new forms and unprecedented levels

 

of public engagement. The draft Go Boston Vision Framework, released in

 

September 2015, focuses on broad goals and targets. An Action Plan to be

 

released in 2016 will identify specific policies and projects to be implemented

 

over the next 5, 10, and 15 years.

 

Go Boston 2030 heralded the arrival of Vision Zero Boston, one of the early

 

action items in the Vision Framework.

 


 

[ 8 ] Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan

 


 

2015: A YEAR OF PROGRESS

 

SPRING

 

2015

 


 

In March 2015, Mayor Walsh announces that the City is committed to eliminating

 

fatal and serious traffic crashes by 2030.

 


 

Within a month of this announcement, BTD Commissioner Gina Fiandaca instructs

 

City staff to replace the word ?accident? with ?crash?, an important practical and

 

symbolic step in changing the way the City thinks about traffic safety.

 


 

In May 2015, a Vision Zero Boston Task Force is established. Led by BTD,

 

the group immediately identifies priority issues and locations on which to

 

focus the city?s resources and attention. Massachusetts Ave and Codman

 

Square emerge as high-crash areas ? a fatal crash in one of these areas

 

later in the summer confirms the need for this focused action.

 


 

SUMMER

 

2015

 


 

FALL

 

2015

 


 

Throughout the summer and fall of 2015, the Vision Zero Boston Task Force

 

compiles and analyzes crash reports and data from the Boston Police Department

 

and Boston Emergency Medical Services and conducts audits of high-crash

 

locations to better understand the scope of the challenge ahead ? a challenge

 

that requires everything from legislative and policy changes, to rapid responses to

 

crashes on the ground, to the implementation of new and improved street designs

 

and traffic safety enforcement programs.

 


 

VISION ZERO TASK FORCE

 

Thanks to the leadership and commitment of the Vision Zero Boston Task Force,

 

the City has a clearer picture of why action is needed now to make our city

 

streets safer for everyone.

 


 

Boston Police Department

 

Boston Public Health

 

Commission

 


 

Department of Innovation

 

& Technology

 

Boston Public Schools

 


 

Boston Transportation

 

Department

 


 

Boston Commission for the

 

Affairs of the Elderly

 


 

Boston Emergency

 

Medical Services

 


 

Boston Cyclists Union

 


 

Boston Commission for

 

Persons with Disabilities

 


 

Boston Public Works

 

Department

 


 

WalkBoston

 


 

Mayor?s Office of New

 

Urban Mechanics

 

Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan [ 9 ]

 


 

VISION ZERO BOSTON: WHY NOW?

 

PUTTING THIS INTO PERSPECTIVE

 

FROM 2010-2014

 


 

79 PEOPLE

 

Fatality data from the Boston Police Department

 

indicates that, despite some anomalies in the

 

data, pedestrian fatalities are on an upward

 

trend. By contrast, bicyclist fatalities are fairly

 

stable and driver fatalities have been declining

 

slightly over time. The trend for pedestrians

 

underscores the importance of addressing

 

safety through Vision Zero efforts.

 


 

WERE KILLED IN A MOTOR VEHICLE,

 

BICYCLE, OR PEDESTRIAN CRASH ON

 

BOSTON ROADS. Source: Boston Police Department

 

YEARLY FATALITIES, BY MODE

 

14

 


 

pedestrian

 

motor vehicle

 

bike

 


 

12

 

10

 

8

 

6

 


 

number of

 

fatalities

 


 

4

 

2

 

0

 

2010

 


 

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL FATALITIES,

 

BY MODE

 


 

PERCENTAGE OF

 

TOTAL INJURIES,

 

BY MODE

 


 

100%

 

90%

 

80%

 


 

27%

 

43%

 

50%

 


 

70%

 

60%

 


 

10%

 


 

40%

 


 

24%

 

6%

 


 

6%

 


 

20%

 


 

50%

 

30%

 


 

31%

 


 

74%

 


 

19%

 

63%

 


 

71%

 


 

53%

 


 

20%

 


 

40%

 


 

13%

 


 

38%

 


 

10%

 


 

14%

 


 

0%

 

2010

 

(N=15)

 


 

2011

 

(N=10)

 


 

motor vehicle

 

bike

 

pedestrian

 

[ 10 ] Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan

 


 

2012

 

(N=21)

 


 

2013

 

(N=16)

 


 

2011

 


 

2014

 

(N=17)

 


 

2014-2015

 

(N=444)

 


 

Source: Fatality data ? Boston Police Department,

 

Injury data ? Boston EMS.

 

Fatality data does not include crashes on roadways

 

that are not owned by the City of Boston.

 


 

2012

 


 

2013

 


 

2014

 


 

It is important to keep in mind

 

that these statistics do not

 

account for exposure ? that is,

 

how many people walk, bike, and

 

drive and how many miles they

 

travel by those modes in Boston.

 

While fewer bicyclists are killed

 

than pedestrians or drivers, there

 

are also many fewer people

 

riding a bicycle in Boston, so

 

their risk of being killed is likely

 

much higher than raw fatality

 

numbers suggest. Conversely,

 

given the many thousands of

 

drivers driving many thousands

 

of miles each year, the handful of

 

driver fatalities likely results in a

 

comparatively low risk of a driver

 

fatality on Boston?s roadways.

 


 

IN 2014,

 


 

1,279 PEOPLE

 


 

REQUIRED EMS DUE TO A

 

PEDESTRIAN OR BICYCLIST

 

CRASH ON BOSTON ROADS

 


 

2-3

 


 

Source: Boston EMS

 


 

LEVEL OF CARE

 


 

per day,

 

on average

 


 

Boston Emergency Medical Services transport disposition is classified in one of four main

 

categories: Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Life Support (ALS), on-site fatality, and

 

patient refusals. BLS ambulance transport is primarily for patients with non-life-threatening

 

injuries, whereas ALS ambulance transport tends to be for more serious injuries requiring

 

advanced care. In 2014, most pedestrians and bicyclists injured in a crash received BLS

 

transport to the hospital. ALS transport occurred for 13% of pedestrians and 5% of bicyclists involved in

 

crashes. On-site fatalities documented by Boston EMS do not include patients in critical condition who

 

do not survive after transport to the hospital. Thankfully, on-site fatalities were rare, at less than 1% for

 

both modes. Additionally, a portion of pedestrians and bicyclists refused to accept medical transport after

 

being involved in a crash.

 


 

724

 


 

CRASH TYPE

 


 

PEDESTRIANS INJURED IN CRASHES

 


 

un

 


 

kn

 


 

non-

 


 

road

 


 

1%

 

13%

 

73%

 

14%

 


 

On-site Fatality

 

Advanced Life Support

 

Basic Life Support

 

Refusal

 


 

= 5 crashes

 


 

n

 


 

5%

 

5%

 


 

area

 


 

backed into

 


 

g

 

lon

 


 

73%

 


 

t

 

ee

 


 

crossing street

 


 

52%

 


 

6%

 


 

motor vehicle

 


 

%

 

11

 


 

str

 


 

a

 


 

unkn

 


 

ad

 


 

own

 


 

ro

 


 

555

 


 

way

 


 

ow

 


 

su

 


 

5%

 


 

ce

 


 

rfa

 


 

BICYCLISTS INJURED IN CRASHES

 


 

%

 


 

12

 


 

= 5 crashes

 

Source: Boston EMS

 


 

16%

 


 

other

 


 

ian

 


 

str

 


 

p

 


 

e

 

ed

 


 

2%

 


 

ke

 

veh

 

2%

 

icle

 

doo 1

 

r

 

0%

 


 

On-site Fatality

 

Advanced Life Support

 

Basic Life Support

 

Refusal

 


 

bi

 


 

<1%

 

5%

 

68%

 

27%

 


 

Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan [ 11 ]

 


 

FOCUSING ON THE ISSUES

 

WHILE FATAL CRASHES

 

HAVE OCCURRED

 

THROUGHOUT THE

 

CITY, THEY ARE MORE

 

CONCENTRATED IN

 

CERTAIN AREAS.

 


 

Boston Police Department

 

Reported Traffic Fatalities

 

2010-2014

 

pedestrian fatality

 

bicyclist fatality

 

motorist fatality

 

Fatality data does not include crashes on

 

roadways that are not owned by the City of

 

Boston.

 


 

ARTERIAL ROADWAYS ARE DISPROPORTIONATELY

 

DANGEROUS FOR ALL MODES.

 


 

LO

 

CA

 

LR

 

OA

 

D

 


 

AR

 


 

TE

 


 

R

 

AL

 

RI

 


 

OA

 


 

D

 


 

8x

 

9x

 

8x

 


 

more pedestrians died on arterial

 

roads than on local roads

 

more bicyclists died on arterial

 

roads than on local roads

 

more drivers died on arterial

 

roads than on local roads

 


 

Source: Fatality data 2010-2014 ? Boston Police Department,

 

GIS data ? City of Boston

 


 

NEIGHBORHOOD SLOW STREETS

 

50% MORE PEDESTRIANS

 

WERE KILLED ON BOSTON?S

 

ROADWAYS THAN MOTORISTS

 


 

Nearly 2 times as

 

many pedestrians

 

[ 12 ] Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan

 

were killed on

 

Source: Fatality data 2010-2014 ?

 

Boston Police Department

 


 

The Boston Transportation Department, in partnership with

 

the Public Works Department, is developing a program

 

that will enable residents to apply for traffic calming on

 

residential streets in their neighborhoods. The program will

 

improve safety by slowing drivers with visual and physical

 

cues, and create residential streets that are safe and

 

inviting for walking, bicycling, and playing.

 


 

INITIAL TARGET AREAS

 

VISION ZERO PRIORITY CORRIDORS

 


 

MASSACHUSETTS AVE

 


 

CODMAN SQUARE

 


 

NEIGHBORHOOD SLOW STREET PILOT ZONES

 


 

STONYBROOK

 


 

TALBOT-NORFOLK TRIANGLE

 


 

Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan [ 13 ]

 


 

[ 14 ] Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan

 


 

DETAILED ACTION PLANS

 

Vision Zero Boston is an Early Action Project of Go Boston 2030, the ongoing

 

city-wide transportation plan. After an extensive community engagement

 

process, safety emerged as a major theme in the questions and comments

 

donated by Bostonians. As a result, ?Eliminate traffic fatalities in Boston? is one

 

of the primary targets in Go Boston 2030?s Vision Framework.

 

Within the Boston Transportation Department (BTD), the Green Links Initiative

 

and Boston Bike Network Plan both focus on ways to protect people who walk,

 

bike, and use other active transportation choices to get around the City. Ongoing

 

capital projects, including Connect Historic Boston and the Commonwealth Ave

 

redesign, are introducing design features to make streets significantly safer for

 

vulnerable users.

 

Other agencies are also working to make streets safer through new programs,

 

partnerships, and improved information sharing. The Boston Public Health

 

Commission (BPHC) supports Safe Routes to School and a range of community

 

health partnerships. The Boston Police Department (BPD) and Boston

 

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) are collecting and analyzing data in new

 

ways to track crashes on our roadways.

 

Guided by representatives from across City departments, the Vision Zero

 

Boston Task Force has developed a holistic and detailed Action Plan that

 

connects and integrates these ongoing City and community initiatives to

 

establish a singular focus of eliminating fatal and serious traffic crashes in the

 

City of Boston by 2030.

 

The Vision Zero Boston Action Plans take aim at the real causes of those traffic

 

crashes. The focus is on specific steps that will make Boston?s streets more

 

walkable, bikeable, and transit-friendly, as well as safer for drivers.

 

By tackling speeds and redesigning roadways, reducing distracted and impaired

 

driving, creating a culture of empathy, and holding ourselves accountable for

 

achieving the Vision Zero goal, we will ensure Boston?s place among the world?s

 

most livable cities long into the future.

 


 

A RAPID RESPONSE TO CRASHES

 

We will not achieve the goal of zero fatal and serious traffic crashes overnight. When tragedy

 

strikes, we are committed to learn every lesson and take every corrective action we can.

 

The Vision Zero Boston Task Force has established a multi-disciplinary, multi-agency Rapid

 

Response Team that will analyze and respond to every fatal traffic crash in the city, following the

 

immediate response of the Boston EMS. This team will study the crash and recommend appropriate

 

street design changes, judicial or legislative follow-up, community outreach, and other necessary

 

actions.

 

This Rapid Response Team will monitor feedback from the community to quickly identify and

 

respond to traffic safety issues that are emerging at particular locations or involve common behavior

 

or vehicle types that need addressing.

 


 

Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan [ 15 ]

 


 

ACTION PLAN TO REDUCE SPEEDS AND

 

BUILD SAFER STREETS

 

Whether driving a car or truck, walking across the street, riding a bike, or skateboarding,

 

higher speeds dramatically increase the number and severity of crashes. Speeding

 

traffic, on main roads and neighborhood streets, decreases the quality of life and

 

discourages walking and bicycling. Boston?s street design toolbox contains numerous

 

traditional and innovative techniques to reduce conflicts.

 

We are committed to area-wide speed reduction through a combination of street design and enforcement

 

strategies that put safety first.

 


 

STREET DESIGN

 

WHAT WE?RE DOING NOW

 

?? Applying traditional and innovative

 

techniques to reduce speed and conflicts on

 

current planning and capital projects. This

 

includes creating protected facilities and

 

intersections and adjusting signal timing and

 

phasing to separate turning movements.

 


 

?? Including protected bike facilities and

 

more pedestrian-friendly streetscapes in

 

capital reconstruction projects such as

 

Connect Historic Boston and the redesign

 

of Commonwealth Ave in order to improve

 

safety for all users.

 


 

?? Focusing on Massachusetts Ave and

 

Codman Square for rapid implementation of

 

low-cost, high-impact improvements.

 


 

?? Working with the Public Works Department

 

(PWD), Boston Public Schools, and BPHC

 

to implement roadway design changes to

 

support Safe Routes to Schools.

 


 

?? Conducting safety assessments with the

 

Vision Zero Boston Task Force.

 

?? Using existing powers given to the Boston

 

Transportation Commissioner to designate 20

 

MPH school zones and safety zones where

 

lower speeds are desired.

 

?? Developing the Neighborhood Slow

 

Streets program for residents to apply for

 

a suite of traffic calming measures for their

 

neighborhoods. Streets will be designated for

 

20 MPH.

 

?? Finalizing the new Green Links program that

 

will connect every neighborhood to the city?s

 

extensive park and greenway system by way

 

of low-stress, traffic-calmed streets, and local

 

trails.

 

?? Implementing the Boston Bikes Network Plan

 

throughout the city.

 

?? Piloting new camera technology to

 

anonymously count the movements of cars,

 

bicycles, and pedestrians over time to inform

 

planning decisions.

 

[ 16 ] Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan

 


 

WHAT WE?RE DOING IN 2016

 

?? Pilot the Neighborhood Slow Streets program

 

in the Talbot-Norfolk Triangle in Dorchester

 

and the Stonybrook neighborhood in Jamaica

 

Plain. Launch full program later in the year.

 

?? Identify locations for Rapid Implementation

 

projects based on crash data, resident

 

requests for Neighborhood Slow Streets, and

 

crowd-sourced data from interactive safety

 

maps. Implement changes in fall 2016 or

 

spring 2017.

 

?? Implement 10 miles of high-priority projects

 

on the Boston Bike Network and develop a

 

five-year rolling Action Plan to increase the

 

number of miles of high-quality bike facilities.

 

?? Create a Safe Crossings program to

 

implement improved bicycle and pedestrian

 

crossings of major streets including criteria

 

for unsignalized, signalized, and mid-block

 

crossings.

 


 

?? Grow the interagency Safe Routes to School

 

program and make streets safer near 6

 

schools.

 

?? Identify locations for improving safety at

 

intersections by installing physical protection

 

for people walking and riding bikes.

 

?? Update the City?s policy on traffic signals to

 

shorten signal cycles, change the default

 

settings to ?walk?, extend crossing times

 

where needed, implement more leading

 

pedestrian intervals (LPI), and better manage

 

turning movements for the protection of

 

pedestrians.

 

?? Identify winter maintenance benchmarks

 

and create a comprehensive plan for

 

snow clearance of bike lanes, sidewalks,

 

crosswalks, and access points to bus stops.

 


 

ENFORCEMENT

 

WHAT WE?RE DOING NOW

 

?? Continuing a data-sharing partnership with

 

WAZE that enables the City to evaluate

 

before/after impacts of design changes on

 

congestion. WAZE also provides an audible

 

reminder to drive safely at crash prone

 

intersections.

 


 

?? Implement ideas from the recently completed

 

pilot Red Light Compliance Study which

 

identifies a number of actions that can be

 

taken to reduce violations, including greater

 

use of LPIs, restricting right turns on red,

 

reducing signal cycle lengths, providing

 

automatic recall for pedestrian indications,

 

and adding bicycle signals.

 


 

WHAT WE?RE DOING IN 2016

 

?? Launch high-visibility enforcement campaigns

 

against speeding, red light running, and

 

failure to yield. Campaigns will focus on highcrash locations and priority areas established

 

by the Vision Zero Boston Task Force.

 

?? Support bills in the state legislature to reduce

 

the city-wide default speed limit to 25 MPH.

 

?? Increase the use of variable message signs

 

and speed radar display to discourage

 

speeding.

 

?? Explore the effectiveness and barriers around

 

automated enforcement technologies to

 

crack down on dangerous driving behaviors

 

such as speeding, red light running, and

 

failure to yield to pedestrians. Also explore

 

drunk driver ignition interlock laws and

 

increased fines for distracted driving. The

 

City will identify if policy changes are needed

 

for implementation.

 


 

Vision Zero Boston: Action Plan [ 17 ]

 


 

ACTION PLAN TO REDUCE DISTRACTED

 

AND IMPAIRED DRIVING

 

Attitudes towards drunk driving have altered dramatically over the past three decades,

 

and while it still happens, it is significantly less common and is generally considered to

 

be socially unacceptable. The advent of new technology, innovative vehicle designs, and

 

mobile devices has brought with it new challenges ? the scourge of distracted driving, for

 

example ? that traffic safety professionals agree can be as much of a threat as drinking and driving.

 

The City?s commitment to reducing distracted and impaired driving is focused on both the driver and the

 

vehicle itself. This requires a broad range of public information and education backed up by a robust

 

enforcement program and the use of new technology and innovation.

 


 

EDUCATION & ENFORCEMENT PROGRAMS

 

WHAT WE?RE DOING NOW

 

?? Addressing motorists who are distracted,

 

operating under the influence, or failing

 

to wear seat belts through enforcement

 

by BPD.

 

?? Providing helmets and lights to peopl...

 


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